Password Managers?

So, any recommendations for Password Managers?

Something that works across Linux, Windows and mobile, and licensed for more than one device.

Not looking for monthly subscription here, or at least something that will not break the bank.

I have been hearing great recommendations for BitWarden.

No comments from people who advertise the product please. :slight_smile:

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The DLN community recommends Bitwarden. :smile:

I use KeePassXC. I am not sure about mobile though.

Edit:

Btw: Managing/remembering servers, logins, passwords

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I’ve used a Rolodex on my desk, KeePassXC, Bitwarden, selfhosted Bitwarden-compatible (vaultwarden), and pass.

I recommend Bitwarden (the cloud one). The data you save is encrypted on the client side and uploaded to their server so it’s just sitting there as encrypted data.

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I coded my own a few years ago on the back of gpg encryption and will still access it occasionally (I’m also working on a new wheel design). But when I vetted and started using Bitwarden at the insistence of DLN, I never looked back. You will find similar products to Bitwarden – but the totality of the package – passwords, IDs, Ccards, notes, desktop, mobile – coupled with the price – in my opinion: unique and unbeatable.

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Bitwarden. Was using Myki for a few weeks at work until they sold the company and discontinued the service. Bitwarden was better. Switched to Keeper for work now and I still think bitwarden is better. I’m always annoyed by the obtrusive windows over login/password boxes that just get in the way. Bitwarden is by far least annoying.

If you want to be an absolute savage and you like things that work well with scripts then pass is hard to beat.

You can pipe them into your clipboard using xsel or xclip or auto-type them using xdotool. There’s also some Wayland derivatives of xdotool if you’ve moved over.

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Another vote here for Bitwarden. I have been using it for 3-4 years now and don’t know how I lived without it before I had it. The yearly subscription is super cheap. Another cool feature is if you have a significant other who is always asking you for passwords to different things you can set them up with an account and create a “collection” to share with them so that you can share those passwords(for streaming services and things like that)

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Many good choices. Best options I’ve found are:

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KeepassXC works for Windows and Linux
KeepassDX is the client I used to use for Android
Strongbox is the client I used to use for iOS

They all use commonly use a *.kdbx file that stores your encrypted password database. You can tie them all together with Syncthing. You can use these for a multiperson/“multiaccount” use case if you use and sync different .kdbx files within the same folder synced via syncthing.

A potential issue is that a files can get weird desynchronizations/race condition issues if the same databases are opened and saved at the same time with different contents. I am uncertain if syncthing has the capability to resolve this. Just a warning not to open databases at the same time. You can adjust the sync check intervals more frequently as the risk of bogging down your own network. Personally I just open one file at a time. Files are usually read frequently and writes are less frequent.

All of the solution mentioned are free (except maybe for Strongbox, which uses a Freemium model - despite being a derivative of keepass).

Bitwarden pricing is cheap enough. My only complaint is that on the desktop, Bitwarden doesnt have the autotype feature (KeePassXC has it) which is very useful especially if a password field has the paste disabled for some reason.

For systems on Windows/Linux and Android, this is my preferred way. If iPhones gets in the mix, Bitwarden becomes a better/saner choice.

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Tried a couple of them and settled on Bitwarden on all my devices.
Not sure about macOS(desktop client), but it works on everything else.

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Another Bitwarden fan here. Highly recommended.

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Bitwarden for me, works everywhere.
I used 1password in the past, it is truly great but they made some changes that made me switch (no more local vaults)

I now run a combination of self hosted, for tech passwords and keys, and their cloud option. And it works great on all my devices, linux machines and my macs.

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KeepassXC rolled out another insane feature with massive improvements these last few months. You can now use it in place of a gnome or kde wallet to manage your account credentials on your desktop machines. It is called Secret Service and the formal documentation is still being processed.

Best method is to create an additional database just for secret service for each desktop or laptop machine. Once you set it up you can remove the existing Kwallet or other service from your desktop machine!!! Works fine with Element + e2e credentials, Nextcloud + OTP, etc.

Other fantastic options are managing gpg keys and ssh-agent. Awesome!
Keepass is close to 20 years old. And you can still recover if you used it back then, even across all the forks!
It is one of the best cross platform, open source projects of all time.

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I’ve been using bitwarden for about 3 years now, and I’m very pleased with it.

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Bitwarden is a very solid choice. You really can’t go wrong. If you want to go Obscure, you might checkout Roboform, it was a tool I used for a LOOOONG time before I started bouncing around a bit, trying to find a better tool. It worked fine though.

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I coded my own a few years ago on the back of gpg encryption and will still access it occasionally (I’m also working on a new wheel design.

But when I vetted and started using Bitwarden at the insistence of DLN, I never looked back. You will find similar products to Bitwarden – but the totality of the package – passwords, IDs, Ccards, notes, desktop, mobile – coupled with the price – in my opinion: unique and unbeatable.

[Link redacted by: Ulfnic, reason: Spammer]

@MarkofCain Is that you? This user copied your whole reply plus a link.

He joined the group one day ago to advertise his product. :slight_smile:

Guess I am a sceptic after all.

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I’m all in on BitWarden, using it on Linux mainly but a little on Win10 and Android, seems to work fine on all 3 with Yubikey integration being a big bonus for me.
I’ve been impressed enough to go from a free user to a premium one.

I started with KeePass purely offline and still like that a lot (it’s my offline backup method for BitWarden now) but the cross platform syncing without me faffing around sold me on making the full time switch.

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spammer. No points for originality but the approach is somewhat unique.