Generating high entropy passwords

I came across this Youtube video about generating high entropy passwords that are easy to remember. It is a video created for LinuxFest Northwest 2020. I hope some of you will find this helpful.

More info can also be found at: https://github.com/NaturalLanguagePasswords/system and https://www.eff.org/dice

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A scientific way for this!

I do this, with varying degrees of success, by using color noun color noun of things I can see, such as GreenGrassSwimmingPool which https://howsecureismypassword.net/ says will take 45 quintillion years to crack.

Great EFF link, thanks for posting!

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The best thing I like about this method is my wife actually uses her password manager now and comfortable with it.

Even a password that takes 16 years to crack by trying every letter combination can be quickly found if it uses very common words through a dictionary based attack. Computerphile has a great video about this sort of thing.

And then another video concerning diceware specifically with some tweaks for added security.

I want to setup BitWarden, but I always wonder ‘what happens if it fails’ because then I’ll be locked out of everything!

I have been using it for over 2 year and could not be happier. Always Always make backups… Bitwarden has an export function you could use to back up your passwords. You could export your passwords to a Csv file and store it on an encrypted usb drive, or just print them out and store it in a safe. I would also recommend to use 2FA on bitwarden.

Do you have it on a Pi? Running local on desktop, standalone server?

I like that you can export them, just do it to a CSV and to a thumb drive that’s only for that. Right now I just remember a lot of them and use FireFox to remember others.

Export it as plain text and put it in an encrypted container (veracrypt, encrypted zip file, etc). Make sure you do a proper wipe and reboot afterwards