Backup Recommendations

Hello. New poster here.

Not too long ago, the DestinationLinux Podcast crew were recommending a backup program. Does anyone recall the name of it? I have Timeshift installed, and it wasn’t that. If there’s a better one I’d like to look into it.

Thanks in advance.

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Episode 146 they discussed DejaDup!!

Do You Need a VPN? Guest Hosts: Bo Weaver (Ethical Hacker) & Dolphin Oracle of MX Linux - DL146

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^^^ What @ChristopherM said, DejaDup if you want a GUI

rsync if you want to script your backups.

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I realized that this is actually a two-part problem. Part one is the backup software, and I thank you for the quick answer. The second part is a cloud storage provider. I want to backup to a local disk, then have that backup copied to the cloud. I have been using Dropbox. They recently dropped support for all but ext4 file systems under Linux, and since I had my backup disk formatted as btrfs, I had to stop uploading files. They have now increased their annual price by $20 to $119/year, but also doubled storage from 1TB to 2TB, so that’s cool. But iDrive currently has an offer for a full years of 3TB storage for just over $3, and even their regular price is much cheaper than Dropbox. But I have only started looking in to them.

So do you have recommendations for reliable cloud storage providers?

Thanks again.

Unfortunately, the most reliable cloud storage is also the most disrespectful of user privacy. Ive never had failures with google drive but also they siphon, process and profit from my personal information too much for me to like them. But thankfully there is cryptomator to do client side encryption.
Other alternatives for that is the S3 bucket from Amazon, which also works with cryptomator.

finding a hosting provider is a bit difficult because there are great companies that provide a solution but are somewhat expensive and then there are cheap options that are ran by very unethical companies. Finding a company that is cheap, good storage size and is also ethical . . . that’s a unicorn.

I’ve heard good things about MEGA.nz, Rackspace, and even Amazon storage but I don’t use any of these. I don’t have a cloud storage solution.

Edit: turns out being a Amazon Prime member gets you 5GB of free Amazon Drive ($60/year for 1TB), which I just found out. They promote it for photos and videos but apparently they allow any files. I uploaded an .AppImage, .eps, .pdf, .pgm, .php, .psd, .ttf, .zip, and a bash script . . . all uploaded just fine.

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I tend to use Restic, You can combine it with Rclone to do backups (as apposed to just replication) to multiple cloud providers.
Wasabi.com offers a nice S3 endpoint for 5 bucks a TB

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Yeah, I’m a little late on this, but my experience is recent so…

A few years ago I switched from Dropbox to Sync for its better plans and security. At that time they said Linux support would be coming at some point. It’s been a PITA dealing with Sync’s web access only. So I asked them if they plan to have Linux support any time soon, and this is their response:

Work on a Linux app keeps getting pushed back. Overall, the number of people requesting Linux has been relatively low. Linux is a passionate community and we’re part of that community, however, we haven’t been able to justify the development time and additional support overhead required to deliver a great Sync experience on Linux. Also being considered is the market segment which is relatively small.

We're not saying never on Linux, but we've been growing fast without it which is why it keeps getting pushed back.

So like we mentioned previously, it's on our long-term roadmap, but no ETA.

I understand, it’s a business. But it’s not a model that works for me. So I switched to Mega, Which DOES support Linux. Bye, bye Sync.

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Backblaze B2 may be an option for you.

It’s S3-compatible storage and is reasonably priced and reliable. I have used it on Linux with restic, rclone and CloudBerry Backup.

I have also use it with HyperBackup on a Synology NAS.